BACKYARD BROADCASTING, LOCAL NEWS JAN 13, 2022

CLINTON COUNTY SCHOOLS CLOSING FOR AT LEAST FIVE DAYS

Due to the rising number of positive cases of Covid-19 in the secondary schools, the threshold of 5% of cases among students and staff at Bucktail High School and Central Mountain High Schoo has been reached.  Central Mountain Middle School is currently at 4% and awaiting test results for many others.  All elementary schools are currently at 3% or lower for total cases.  The PA Department of Health recommends full remote learning when the 5% threshold is reached.

As of Thursday, January 13, 2022,  we will be closing Bucktail High School (7-12), Central Mountain High School (9-12) and Central Mountain Middle School (5-8). 

We will close for a minimum of five days with an expected return on Tuesday, January 18, 2022.

COVID CASES LOCALLY FROM YESTERDAY

The Pennsylvania Department of Health on Wednesday reported new COVID-19 cases. Clinton County reported 68 new cases. In Centre County 353 new cases were recorded. Lycoming County added 241. Tioga added 40. Northumberland County registered 183 new, while Union County had 54, Snyder 37 and Montour 24

GUILTY PLEAS FOR AGGRAVATED ASSAULT CHARGES ON AVIS MAN

Aaron Confer, 23, of Avis, entered guilty pleas in the Clinton County Court of Common Pleas on Tuesday morning to one count of Aggravated Assault of a victim less than 6 years old (F2), and one count of Endangering Welfare of Children (F2).  The two guilty pleas were taken by Common Pleas Judge Michael F. Salisbury just a few days before Confer was slated to pick a jury on Friday, January 14th.  Pine Creek Township Police filed charges after they were called to the Lock Haven Hospital after a mother had taken her 3-month-old child to the hospital for injuries and bruises on the infant’s body.  Police allege that the child suffered a fractured clavicle in the assault. Confer posted $250,000 bail and remained free as he awaited trial. Sentencing is scheduled for March 14, 2022 at 8:30AM.  He faces a maximum sentence of 20 years incarceration.

NEW BUILDING FOR SUNBURY POLICE

It is a new building, a new year and a new fresh outlook for the Sunbury Police Department.  The new venture at 337 Arch Street began last spring with a price tag over $1 million. Some minor details are becoming reality. According to Chief Hare, they will have a child-friendly interview room, thanks to the Sunbury Arts Council. It will be a room where the children can feel safe and as comfortable as possible, with a softer tone in the paint and décor. According to an online media source, Hare went on to say corporate sponsors will be mentioned at a later date when officers host a grand opening.

HOUSE ADVANCES CITIZEN’S CONGRESSIONAL MAP, GROVE SAYS

For the first time in the history of the Commonwealth, the House advanced a congressional district map created by a citizen of Pennsylvania, Rep. Seth Grove (R-York) announced. The map approved in House Bill 2146 remains largely identical to the plan submitted by citizen and Lehigh Valley resident Amanda Holt. It includes very minor adjustments recommended by citizens across the Commonwealth to improve the compactness of districts, respond to citizen concerns regarding communities of interest and increase minority representation in Philadelphia.Holt’s map was one of the 19 verified statewide maps submitted to the committee through the website, which also allowed residents to identify their communities of interest and comment on proposed plans. House Bill 2146 now goes to the Senate for consideration.

FIRST SEMESTER TO START ONLINE

Lock Haven University has announced that its spring 2022 semester will begin on Monday, Jan. 24, with the first week of classes to be delivered online. The university will continue all classes the week of Monday, Jan. 31 as regularly scheduled – in-person, hybrid or online. By starting the semester online, it will allow time for the expected post-holiday surge in COVID-19 cases to subside. LHU will also stagger the move-in schedule and provide a robust testing protocol for students living on campus. All students residing on campus will be required to have a negative COVID test before being permitted to complete the move-in process.

PACE AND PACENET

Governor Tom Wolf today was joined by state and local officials and older Pennsylvanians to celebrate recently signed legislation to expand eligibility in the Pharmaceutical Assistance Contract for the Elderly (PACE) and the Pharmaceutical Assistance Contract for the Elderly Needs Enhancement Tier (PACENET) programs.“Ensuring that older Pennsylvanians have access to necessary services, including quality health care and affordable prescription drugs, is a priority of my administration,” said Gov. Wolf. Programs like PACE and PACENET serve as a lifeline for hundreds of thousands of older adults who need assistance with paying for their prescription medications and provide critical support to older Pennsylvanians.” PACE and PACENET currently enroll more than 250,000 older Pennsylvanians. The income limit expansions mean that an additional 100,000 older adults are now eligible with an expected 20,000 older adults expected to enroll in 2022. Enrollment begins in February.

SEXUAL ASSAULT CHARGES ON DANVILLE MAN

Charges of statutory sexual assault and over a dozen related counts for a Danville man as he is accused of having sex with a 13-year-old girl upwards of a dozen times over a span of two occasions last week. State police report John Andrew Kriner provided drugs and alcohol to the minor before engaging in intercourse. It was the second arrest for Kriner on similar charges with this girl. According to the Daily Item, police warned Kriner as a juvenile to end contact with the girl when he turns 18. Kriner was charged with rape and other charges,  jailed in lieu of $150,000 bail with a preliminary hearing in front of District Justice Marvin Shrawder on Jan. 20th.

BUCKNELL GRADUATE MAKING A DIFFERENCE

The first transplant of a pig heart into a human patient last week was led by a doctor who graduated from Bucknell University in the biomedical engineering program. Dr. Bartley Giffith, who graduated in 1970, performed a seven-hour surgery Friday at the University of Maryland Medical Center in Baltimore. According to the DailyItem, Griffith was a biology major, played men’s lacross and was instrumental in launching the biomedical engineering program at Bucknell University.

IMPROVE YOUR WILDLIFE HABITAT

It’s not too early for landowners to begin making plans to improve wildlife habitat this spring and into the future by planting tree and shrub species offered by the Pennsylvania Game Commission’s Howard Nursery. The 2022 seedling order form is available online, and sales began Monday. The Howard Nursery, located in Centre County, grows tree and shrub seedlings for use on State Game Lands, Hunter Access properties, the Seedling for Schools program, and other Game Commission conservation partners. Any remaining surplus is available to Pennsylvania residents for purchase. Seedlings are sold in units of 25. The order form is available at www.pgc.pa.gov. There is a link under Quick Clicks.

GAME COMMISSION ASKING FOR HELP TO FIND TURKEYS

The Game Commission is asking for the public’s help finding turkeys to trap for ongoing and new turkey projects. The agency is encouraging Pennsylvanians to report the location of any turkey flocks they see between now and March 15. Information is being collected online at https://pgcdatacollection.pa.gov/TurkeyBroodSurvey. Visitors to that webpage will be asked to provide the date of the sighting, the location, and the type of land (public, private or unknown) where birds are seen, among other things. Game Commission crews will assess sites for the potential to trap turkeys. Turkeys will not be moved; they’ll simply be leg banded and released on site. In four Wildlife Management Units (WMUs) a sampling also will be outfitted with GPS transmitters, then be released back on site, to be monitored over time.

STANDOFF WITH PINE CREEK TOWNSHIP MAN

A Pine Creek Township man was served with a Protection From Abuse order by the Clinton County Sheriff’s office yesterday. Later the same day, Daniel Harold Mikitko allegedly called the victim upwards of a dozen times.  The victim contacted the state police and Mikitko refused to exit his residence, instead threatening troopers and other local police.  The Pennsylvania State Police Special Emergency Response Team was activated around 10 pm.   Mikitko continued to threaten officers with a firearm until 5 am when he was taken into custody with less lethal force with no injuries to Mikitko or the police. Multiple charges, including terroristic threats and resisting arrest, have been filed.

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